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Abbey Travel

Lufthansa City Center

Telephone: +62 21 30055999
Fax:
+62 21 30055996
Email:
info.jkt@abbey.travel
Contact Person: Abbey Travel Lufthansa City Center Head Office
AXA Tower 29th Floor, Jl. Prof. Dr. Satrio Kav. 18,
12940 Jakarta
Indonesia

Opening Hours
Monday - Friday : 8.30 am - 5.30 pm (UTC+7) Saturday : 9.00 am - 01.00 pm (UTC+7) Sunday & Public Holiday : Closed

Ulundanu Temple

Flores

is one the most fascinating and beautiful island, located in the southern part of Indonesia in East Nusa Tenggara province. Geographically, Flores is part of Indonesia’s Lesser Sunda Islands. From west to east the main Lesser Sunda Islands are Bali, Lombok, Sumbawa, Flores, Sumba, Timor, Alor archipelago, Barat Daya Islands and Tanimbar Islands.

Long hidden in the shadows of its more famous neighbor Bali, the island of Flores is finally emerging as a unique destination of its own.
So, after visiting the lair of the Komodo dragons, take time to marvel at some of the wonders of Flores. Here, you can swim in pristine lakes and waterfalls, dive at one of the 50 spectacular dive sites, go kayaking among craggy coasts and mangrove shores, explore mysterious caves and be warmly welcomed by the island’s people in their rituals, dances and daily life.

Flores spells adventure, diving, eco-tours, and mountain climbing interspersed with visits to prehistoric heritage sites, traditional villages and cultural events. Find some of the world’s most exotic underwater life, dive in the pristine seas of Komodo, or swim along with huge manta rays, dolphins, and dugongs in the island of Flores!

 

KOMODO DRAGON

Komodo dragons, or Komodo monitors, are largest living lizard in the world. These wild dragons typically weigh about 154 pounds (70 kilograms), but the largest verified specimen reached a length of 10.3 feet (3.13 meters) and weighed 366 pounds (166 kilograms). Males tend to grow larger and bulkier than females.
Komodo dragons are limited to a few Indonesian islands of the Lesser Sunda group, including Rintja, Padar and Flores, and of course the island of Komodo, the largest at 22 miles (35 kilometers) long. They have not been seen on the island of Padar since the 1970s.
They live in tropical savanna forests but range widely over the islands, from beach to ridge top.